Ramayana

ramayana-sita-rama-featured-1200x1200.jpg

 

 

Written by Valmiki
Re-told by C. Rajagopalachari
Edited and narrated by Amala Bhakta Dasa (ACBSP)
With background music and sound effects.
One of the most-loved epic stories of ancient India, the Ramayan takes hold of the imagination and works its way into the heart.

This narration is not just an in-depth story of the life of Lord Ramachandra, but is a revelation of some of the most fascinating personalities in Vedic history. It portrays ideals–the ideal husband, wife, brother, friend and servant–under the most trying, if not overwhelming circumstances.

In this slightly abridged edition, the multiple-voice characterizations, traditional Indian background music, and realistic sound effects will keep you engrossed in the story for hours at a time. Your imagination will see Lord Rama’s father, King Dasaratha banish him from the kingdom to the forest for 14 years; His wife Sita kidnapped by the demon Ravana; His servant Hanuman discover Her whereabouts; and Rama lead the monkey troops into battle and finally kill Ravana.

Listen or download the audio here

Mystic India

What a story ! The Journey of Discovery and Knowledge, undertaken by a little boy !

 

 

 ( All rights belong to BAPS Sanstha this video is just for educational purposes)

The History of Hindu India

“The History of Hindu India”( Part One) was developed by the editors of Hinduism Today magazine in collaboration with Dr. Shiva Bajpai, Professor Emeritus of History, California State University Northridge. It is intended to provide an authentic presentation of the early history of India and Hinduism for use in American 6th grade social study classes, as well as Hindu temple study groups and general presentations on the Hindu religion and history.

This documentary is based on the first chapter of the textbook, The History of Hindu India, published in 2011. It covers Indian history from the Indus-Saraswati Civilization up to the Gupta period (to 300 ce). The Hindu concept of God is explained, along with the key concepts of karma, dharma, ahimsa and reincarnation, the practice of temple worship, major saints and the main Hindu scriptures.

 

 

“The History of Hindu India” (Part Two)
Covering Indian history from 300 to 1100 ce, this documentary is based on the second chapter of the textbook, “The History of Hindu India,” published in 2011. It opens with magnificent footage of the famed Kailasanatha Temple in Maharashtra, then presents the political history of India at a time when a third of the world’s population lived there. It explores the Gupta Empire, the Huna invasions, the visits of Buddhist monks Faxian and Xuanzang, the initial incursions of Arab Muslim armies in the 8th century, and the rise of the great Chola kingdom of South India. City and village life is described, along with marriage arranging and jati, the joint family structure. This period also witnessed the beginning of the Bhakti Movement and the construction of thousands of famous and still active Hindu temples.

 

 

The History of Hindu India (Part Three)
This documentary is based on the third chapter of the textbook, “The History of Hindu India,” published in 2011. It covers Indian history from 1100 to 1850 ce, from the Arab Muslim invasions to British rule, a time of great difficulty for the Indian people. These extensive foreign invasions are recounted, including the plunder of the great Siva temple at Somnath, and the establishment of the Mughal Empire by the 16th century in most of India, its subsequent decline by the mid-18th century and the gradual control of India by the British. The documentary provides an account of the saints of the powerful Bhakti Movement, including Ramananda and Kabir. One section is devoted to an overview of the Sikh religion, from its founding in the 16th century by Guru Nanak to formation of the Khalsa by Guru Gobind Singh in the 18th century. This is followed by a brief introduction to Indian music and its basic concepts of tala (rhythm), raga (scale) and improvisation.

 

 

(For more information and for class lesson plans based on the book, visit http://www.hinduismtoday.com/education/. This documentary is directed and produced by Sushma Khadepaun; produced and narrated by Roger (Raj) Narayan. Funded by the Uberoi Foundation, Institute for Curriculum Advancement, this film may be freely distributed for educational purposes.)

The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (full audio book)

 

 

From the collection of the youtube channel:GreatestAudioBooks.com

The Yoga tradition is much older, there are references in the Mahābhārata, and the Gitā identifies three kinds of yoga. The Yoga Sūtras codifies the royal or best (rāja) yoga practices, presenting these as an eight-limbed system (ashtānga). The philosophic tradition is related to the Sankhya school. The focus is on the mind; the second sutra defines Yoga – it is the cessation of all mental fluctuations, all wandering thoughts cease and the mind is focused on a single thought.
In contrast to the focus on the mind in the Yoga sutras, later traditions of Yoga such as the Hatha yoga focus on more complex asanas or body postures.

Patañjali defended in his yoga-treatise several ideas that are not the mainstream of either Sankhya or Yoga. He, according to the Iyengar adept, biographer and scholar Kofi Busia, acknowledges the ego, not as a separate entity. The subtle body linga sarira he would not regard as permanent and he would deny it a direct control over external matters. This is not in accord with classical Sankhya and Yoga.

Although much of the aphorisms in the Yoga Sutra possibly pre-dates Patanjali, it is clear that much is original and it is more than a mere compilation. The clarity and unity he brought to divergent views prevalent till then have inspired a long line of teachers and practitioners up to the present day in which B.K.S. Iyengar is a known defender. With some translators, he seems to be a dry and technical propounder of the philosophy, but with others, he is an empathic and humorous witty friend and spiritual guide.

Patañjali (Sanskrit: पतञ्जलि, IPA: [pət̪əɲɟəli]) is a Sanskrit proper name. Several important Sanskrit works are ascribed to one or more authors of this name, and a great deal of scholarship has been devoted over the last century or so to the issue of disambiguation.

Amongst the more important authors called Patañjali are:

– The author of the Mahābhāṣya, an advanced treatise on Sanskrit grammar and linguistics framed as a commentary on Kātyāyana’s vārttikas (short comments) on Pāṇini’s Aṣṭādhyāyī. This Patañjali’s life is the only one which can be securely dated (as one of the grammatical examples he uses makes reference to the siege of the town of Sāketā by the Greeks, an event known from other sources to have taken place around 120 BC).

– The compiler of the Yoga Sūtras, an important collection of aphorisms on Yoga practice, who according to some historians was a notable person of Samkhya, contemporaneous with Ishvarakrishna’s Samkhya-karika around 400 CE.

– The author of an unspecified work of medicine (āyurveda).
(Summary adapted from Wikipedia. org – Attribution: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?t…

OM Shanti! Shanti! Shantih!

The Upanishads

The Upanishads are the concluding portions of the Vedas or the end of the Vedas. The teaching based on them is called Vedanta. The Upanishads are the gist and the goal of the Vedas. They form the very foundation of Hinduism.

There are as many Upanishads to each Veda as there are Sakhas, branches or recensions, i.e., 21, 109, 1000 and 50 respectively to the four Vedas (The Rig-Veda, The Yajur-Veda, The Sama-Veda and the Atharva-Veda).

The different philosophers of India belonging to different schools such as Monism, Qualified Monism, Dualism, Pure Monism, Difference-cum non-difference, etc., have acknowledged the supreme authority of the Upanishads.
They have given their own interpretations, but they have obeyed the authority. They have built their philosophy on the foundation of the Upanishads.

Even the Western scholars have paid their tribute to the seers of the Upanishads. At a time when Westerners were clad in barks and were sunk in deep ignorance, the Upanishadic seers were enjoying the eternal bliss of the Absolute (God), and had the highest culture and civilisation.

The most important Upanishads are :

Isa, Kena, Katha, Prasna, Mundaka, Mandukya, Aitareya, Taittiriya, Chhandogya, Brihadaranyaka, also Kaushitaki, Svetasvatara and Maitrayani. These are supremely authoritative.

May the fundamental truths of the Vedas be revealed unto you all, like the Amalaka fruit in the palm of your hand. May Gayatri, the blessed Mother of the Vedas, impart to you the milk of Knowledge, the ancient wisdom of the Upanishads.

 

 

Here you can enjoy the most famous Upanishads in audio  (full translation as it is, no commentary)

 

 

Recently I found this excellent virtual instructional guide for the same subject